The Origins of Hypernet and Galileo

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Ivan Ravlich, ABD in Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford, bridges the divide between several scientific and technological disciplines (chemical engineering, materials science, aerospace engineering, theoretical physics).  While preparing to run large scale simulations on extended theories of gravity for his doctoral research, he realized that the bottleneck of innovation in nearly every scientific field is the lack of access to available parallel computation. 

At the same time, Todd Chapman, PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics, was working with his graduate advisor to make it possible to run serious aerospace simulations on an iphone5.  Todd was fascinated by edge computing and the idea of carrying out meaningful physics calculations on a handheld device in the field, where the data was being generated.  He ultimately found that it was possible to use a handheld device to reproduce cutting edge physics work from the late 1990s and early 2000s, which would have been carried out at that time using massive machines costing multiple millions of dollars.

It was not computing that brought Ivan and Todd together, however, but rather their shared love of playing music, especially “pretty terrible rip offs of 80s hair metal.”  They eventually realized that they had both been confronting a universal and widespread problem across scientific fields and that they might have ideas for solving it.

Researchers and engineers across all industries can spend 70-80% of their time trying to get their computing tools to work and only 20-30% on the meat of their projects.  At the same time, computing power is all around us, including in the consumer electronics Todd and Ivan encountered all over Stanford’s campus. This inspired them to create Hypernet, a blockchain-enabled marketplace with the potential to harness devices around the globe and make their computing power easily accessible.  The goal was to facilitate serious data analytics, scientific simulations, and all other computing intensive workloads. 

They also recognized that computing tools must be easy to use, not just accessible, so that subject-matter experts can focus on their science instead of their tools.  This is why they built Galileo, a portal interface that provides just the right degree of simplicity to free the user of implementation concerns while still allowing for advanced usage.  In terms of accessibility and usability, Hypernet and Galileo could do for cloud tools and distributed computing what the desktop and mouse did for the operating system and PC revolution.  

Watch the video to hear the origin story!

Introducing: Galileo, the Portal to Hypernet

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After much anticipation, the Hypernet team is today launching Galileo, the universal solution for distributed computing. Galileo is the portal to Hypernet, through which the world’s computing power will be accessed.

The Galileo app advances the Hypernet mission of democratizing the means of discovery and technological progress, as Kyle Wiggers so clearly explains in this piece for VentureBeat. It is a revolutionary tool for engineers, researchers, and data analysts, who can now simply drag and drop their code to access remote computing resources. It helps to automate DevOps by eliminating the need for extensive, complicated, and time-consuming cloud setup. With Galileo, Hypernet enables brilliant minds, wherever they may be found, to focus on solving the world’s greatest problems.

We invite Hypernet supporters and the engineers and data scientists in their networks to sign up and try it out, themselves, for free.

Ivan Ravlich, our project lead and co-founder at Hypernet Labs, explains, “With Galileo we want to immediately upskill your entire team by eliminating the need for specialized knowledge to access compute power through a fast and easy-to-use platform. This allows people to spend minutes, rather than weeks, accessing required computing power. In terms of accessibility and usability, Galileo and Hypernet do for cloud tools and distributed computing what the desktop and mouse did for the operating system and PC revolution.”

Whereas the Magellan application was designed only for our supply-side supporters, Galileo encompasses both the demand and supply sides of the Hypernet network. Our next step is to connect Galileo with the marketplace features our blockchain engineers have developed for our testnet. The public release of the testnet will be preceded by testing within Project Magellan.

The concept of a global decentralized supercomputer was introduced with the advent of Ethereum, and Hypernet is making this a functional reality for the purposes of all compute intensive work (data analysis, AI/ML, simulation, rendering). As an extremely useful technical innovation, Galileo helps us to drive widespread adoption of blockchain technology.

A sampling of Galileo’s first real-world applications

Dam breach analysis for dam safety: Engineers in hydrology and hydraulics have used Galileo for hundreds of hours of runs.

Bio Life Sciences: A researcher used Galileo to render 60GB of data and produce 3D imaging of the simulated effects of air pollution inside lungs.

Market Analysis: A market analyst built an algorithm to predict currency markets and used Galileo for data analytics, achieved 60% accuracy.

Social Sciences: A legal scholar and anthropologist used Galileo for quantitative comparative country studies of the effects of specific laws.

Space Exploration / Video Rendering: A plasma rocket company used Galileo to process 3D 4k renderings of their proof of concept ships.

Galileo Benefits

Scale up your compute resources in minutes with no setup

  • Got a large project with a short deadline? Access more powerful machines quickly and easily.
  • Stop wasting weeks or months configuring your cloud setup. Enable engineers and researchers to focus on their areas of expertise, not cloud infrastructure.

Easily access remote computation machines, on- and off-premises

  • Simply drag and drop project folders onto office workstations or cloud devices you control and run remotely immediately
  • View all jobs in progress on each machine
  • Improvement over Remote Desktop and SSH: multiple users can now run different jobs in one machine simultaneously

Automate deployment of compute jobs and script against the Galileo engine

  • Parallel computational workloads on one or many machines
  • Easy-to-use SDK to deploy hundreds or thousands of runs for sensitivity analysis or full-blown Monte Carlo simulations

Run securely and privately

  • By default, no one can run on your machine. If you want friends or colleagues to be able to run on your machine, you can invite them and set permissions.
  • Secure communications: HTTPS, WSS. All communications hashed (256-bit SHA3) and signed (2048-bit RSA, RSASSA-PSS)
  • End-to-end encryption: AES-CTR (256-bit key, 128-bit unique counter block)

Work smarter with collaborators — shared project folders

  • Share data sets, models, and results using any network drive or major cloud storage provider.
  • Easy management of large datasets: avoid transferring and copying large projects & results files on every deployment, and start running remotely immediately.

Sign up to try it out yourself!

September 2019 Roadmap Update

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We are steadily moving forward in our product roadmap, and exciting times are ahead. We are now in the “Powered Ascent” phase of our map, carrying out closed beta testing of the Hypernet access portal and internal testing of our blockchain payment channels and mechanics.

We’ve been working hard recruiting selected users who are eager to test drive the Hypernet testnet for their scientific computing workloads. To be clear, scientific computing is a necessary component of all research and engineering, carried out across industries, in the private sector, public sector, and academia. It includes data analysis and all work involving simulations. It’s clear that we are poised to solve critical pain-point problems for a broad range of scientific computing users. As testing continues, the engineering team is solving problems quickly and prioritizing building the most in-demand features.

While we’ve been working with test users — on both the demand and supply sides of the network, through several phases of the development process — , we’re now happy to announce that there are daily active researchers using the beta Hypernet portal application to carry out their professional computational work!

“The great news is that I’m so used to using the Hypernet portal (it’s really easy and convenient) that when it’s down I feel much less productive! Point is, it’s super useful.” — Active test user in the energy sector

A major feature of the access portal is its ease of use. Currently, it is common for researchers and engineers to feel that they are spending more time building their tools from scratch than they’re spending in their areas of expertise. This is true whether they are using their own machines, computers in a lab or office they can access, or cloud. Hypernet simplifies the entire equation. The goal of the Hypernet portal is for users to be able to purchase extra compute power through a blockchain-enabled marketplace and manage their own access to their machines, even if they will not be offering these machines on the supply side of Hypernet.

Testing deployment on embedded devices

As you know, members of our community have already taken part in supply-side testing through Project Magellan. As projected in the roadmap plans, we’ve now begun to merge supply- and demand-side testing with a select few Project Magellan members, and we will be onboarding more of them over the next few weeks in a controlled way.

After we move forward with the merge, the coming steps for Project Magellan will be to begin testing the blockchain payment channels and network governance features, which are currently undergoing rigorous internal testing and scrutiny. We look forward to this next phase in the roadmap.

Roadmap Update

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The new Hypernet roadmap condenses previous completed milestones and looks forward in more detail towards everything that is very quickly approaching.

As you know from previous updates, we are currently in “liftoff” — closed beta & internal blockchain testing. While previous steps mostly involved infrastructure construction, we are entering a more dynamic phase of product testing & aggressive and targeted user recruitment in preparation for mainnet launch.

The next few months promise to be intense and exhilarating. Get ready!

Note that phases of the roadmap are not equivalent in terms of time.

HyperNews: Magellan Looks Ahead

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Hypernet is on a mission to accelerate the entire range of scientific and high-performance computing in both academic research and industry, thereby crafting an unprecedentedly seamless experience on the blockchain. We intend to do this by providing a one-stop tool to allow anyone, working with any kind of scientific workload, to seamlessly run their code on any machine they choose — without the need to set up a VM or waste time configuring remote login and installation.

Last Wednesday, with the help of our Project Magellan test group, our supply side portal to the Hypernet testnet went live.

Ivan Ravlich sending jobs and live chatting with the Project Magellan group.

Our engineers have already completed over 200 compute jobs using supporters’ machines, located all over the world. This success is a significant step towards implementation of the full Hypernet vision.

The Hyperoffice during the live test.

Leveraging our supporters’ unique expertise from their time in the blockchain space, Project Magellan is an invaluable part of helping the Hypernet team craft the buyer-seller interaction and user experience. By allowing us to run the first iteration of tests with a myriad of workloads on various different machines, the Magellan users are helping us to identify and correct critical bugs and inefficiencies.

Project Magellan will continue into the summer as we test new functionalities and bring the various pieces of the Hypernet vision together for the big launch. Users’ input will directly contribute to the improvements we release on a regular basis during this time.

Dan Luo, Elliot Shohet, Conrad Bailey, Todd Chapman, and Steven Ingram.

Our dream and goal is to enable thinkers and creators by removing the barriers of access to compute power around the world. Welcome to the digital frontier.

Join the Project Magellan waitlist here.

Project Magellan: We Have Lift-Off

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Hypernet is on a mission to accelerate the entire range of scientific and high-performance computing in both academic research and industry, thereby crafting an unprecedentedly seamless experience on the blockchain. We intend to do this by providing a one-stop tool to allow anyone, working with any kind of scientific workload, to seamlessly run their code on any machine they choose — without the need to set up a VM or waste time configuring remote login and installation.

Last Wednesday, with the help of our Project Magellan test group, our supply side portal to the Hypernet testnet went live.

Ivan Ravlich sending jobs and live chatting with the Project Magellan group.

Our engineers have already completed over 200 compute jobs using supporters’ machines, located all over the world. This success is a significant step towards implementation of the full Hypernet vision.

The Hyperoffice during the live test.

Leveraging our supporters’ unique expertise from their time in the blockchain space, Project Magellan is an invaluable part of helping the Hypernet team craft the buyer-seller interaction and user experience. By allowing us to run the first iteration of tests with a myriad of workloads on various different machines, the Magellan users are helping us to identify and correct critical bugs and inefficiencies.

Project Magellan will continue into the summer as we test new functionalities and bring the various pieces of the Hypernet vision together for the big launch. Users’ input will directly contribute to the improvements we release on a regular basis during this time.

Dan Luo, Elliot Shohet, Conrad Bailey, Todd Chapman, and Steven Ingram.

Our dream and goal is to enable thinkers and creators by removing the barriers of access to compute power around the world. Welcome to the digital frontier.

Join the Project Magellan waitlist here.